Title page for etd-0820112-185657


[Back to Results | New Search]

URN etd-0820112-185657
Author Tzu-Fan Lai
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5345 times. Download 380 times.
Department Environmental Engineering
Year 2011
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Cooking Oil Fume Emitted from Restaurants by Nano-sized TiO2 Photocatalyst Coated Fiberglass Filter and Ozone Oxidation Technology
Date of Defense 2012-06-15
Page Count 135
Keyword
  • decomposition efficiency
  • restaurants
  • volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
  • nano-sized photocatalysts
  • ozone oxidation techology
  • cooking oil fume
  • Abstract Recently, restaurant employees exposing to cooking oil fume with potential lung cancer was highly concerned, indicating cooking oil fume emitted from restaurants might cause tremendous hazard to human health. This study combined photocatalytic oxidation and ozone oxidation technology to decompose VOCs from the exhaust of cooking oil fume from restaurants. Firstly, this study selected three different types of restaurants to implement air pollutant measurements in the indoor dinning room and stack emission. Indoor TVOCs continuous monitoring data showed that the highest TVOCs concentration was generally observed in the dining peak time.
    In this study, photocatalyst coated fiberglass filter was prepared by impregnation procedure and its characteristics was analyzed by SEM and XRD. Experimental results showed that the particle size of photocatalyst ranged from 25 to 50 nm and had high percentage of Anatase, suggesting that it had high photocatalytic reactivity.
    This study designed a continuous-flow reaction system combined nano-sized TiO2 photocatalysis with ozone oxidation technology to decompose VOCs from cooking oil fume. After passing through a fiberglass filter to remove oil droplets, the cooking oil fume then coated with nano-sized titanium oxide (UV/TiO2) fiberglass filter purification system, and then injected ozone into the system to decompose residual VOCs. This study further investigated the influences of operating parameters, including TVOCs initial concentration, O3 injection concentration, and reaction temperature on the decomposition efficiency of TVOCs by using the UV/TiO2/O3 technology.
    When the photocatalytic reaction temperature was 35~50℃, the TVOC decomposition efficiency slightly increased with reaction temperature, however, when the reaction temperature went up to 55℃, the TVOC decomposition efficiency increased only slightly, but did not increased linearly.
    Combination of photocatalysis and ozone oxidation system performance test results showed that ozone could decompose approximately 34% VOCs, and followed by the photocatalytical reaction of residual pollutants, achieving an overall decomposition efficiency of about 75%; while photocatalytic reaction can remove 64% of TVOCs and followed by O3 for the decomposition of residual pollutants, achieving an overall decomposition efficiency up to 94%. It showed that the combined UV/TiO2+O3 system could effectively remove VOCs in the cooking oil fume from the exhaust of restaurants.
    By using GC/MS to qualitatively analyze the speciation of TVOCs from cooking oil fume before and after UV/TiO2/O3, the results showed that the composition of VOCs had a decreasing trend. The peak area and dilution factor were applied to estimate the decomposition efficiency of different VOCs species. The decomposition efficiencies of pentane, 2-acrolein, acrolein, heptane, pentanal, hexanal, 2-hexenal, heptanal, heptenal and ethylhexenal were 56.21%, 72.88%, 51.33%, 32.23%, 59.04%, 69.22%, 73.53%, 41.37%, 92.57%, and 96.02%.
    Finally, a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model was applied to simulate the photocatalytic decomposition efficiency with the initial concentration of cooking oil fume. Model simulation results showed that the reaction rate increased with the initial TVOCs concentration. However, when TVOCs concentration increased gradually, the reaction rate became constant since the activated sites on the photocatalyst’s surface was limited and cannot allow more VOC molecules diffuse to the activated sites for further photocatalytic reaction.
    Advisory Committee
  • Shui-Jen Chen - chair
  • Chitsan Lin - co-chair
  • Yuan-Chung Lin - co-chair
  • Chung-Hsuang Hung - co-chair
  • Chung-Shin Yuan - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0820112-185657.pdf
  • Indicate in-campus at 0 year and off-campus access at 5 year.
    Date of Submission 2012-08-20

    [Back to Results | New Search]


    Browse | Search All Available ETDs

    If you have more questions or technical problems, please contact eThesys