Title page for etd-0804114-164844


[Back to Results | New Search]

URN etd-0804114-164844
Author Pao-chuan Hsu
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5582 times. Download 998 times.
Department Foreign Language and Literature
Year 2013
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document
Language English
Title Melancholy or the Melancholic Mood in John Keats's 1819 Odes
Date of Defense 2014-06-19
Page Count 102
Keyword
  • melancholy
  • melancholia
  • Freud
  • Kristeva
  • Keats
  • psychoanalysis
  • Abstract Melancholy, or the melancholic mood, is one of the major themes in John Keats's
    1819 odes. Many studies focus on the aesthetics of Keats's melancholy, but the
    development of the poet's self-melancholizing mechanism in the odes and the
    reconciliation between the poet and his lost object are less discussed. This thesis
    approaches Keats's melancholy in psychoanalytic methods, probing into the texts to
    investigate how the melancholic mood arrests the poet. Indeed, The poet, disturbed by
    his dream-like vision with the three figures—Love, Poesy, and Ambition—begins his
    quest for the lost indolence in the spring odes. From "Ode to Psyche," "Ode to a
    Nightingale," to "Ode on a Grecian Urn," Keats pursues the three figures in their
    corresponding odes, but in vain. The poet then even faces a death threat from his
    imaginary urn-doppelganger. Unable to deal with the urn, the poet develops a
    metaphorical language structure to defend himself against death with a series of
    metaphors in "Ode on Melancholy." The metaphorical language, soon, overwhelms
    the poet and drowns him in the illusions of eternal life. And therefore, in "Ode on
    Indolence," the poet has failed to escape from the three figures, for they are the only
    connections to the lost indolence and the easeful melancholic mood. However, in "To
    Autumn," the poet frees himself from the melancholic mood. By personifying
    Autumn, Keats confronts the enigmatic Other with his language, recovers the cause of
    desire, and finally redeems himself from his melancholic mood that troubles him in
    the first half year of 1819.
    Advisory Committee
  • Li-Ching Chen - chair
  • Chia-jung Lee - co-chair
  • Fu-jen Chen - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0804114-164844.pdf
  • indicate access worldwide
    Date of Submission 2014-09-04

    [Back to Results | New Search]


    Browse | Search All Available ETDs

    If you have more questions or technical problems, please contact eThesys