Title page for etd-0720115-205712


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URN etd-0720115-205712
Author Ping-hsin Liu
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5583 times. Download 734 times.
Department Biological Sciences
Year 2014
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title Role of Docosahexaenoic Acid against Ketamine-induced Gliotoxicity
Date of Defense 2015-07-31
Page Count 56
Keyword
  • ketamine
  • DHA
  • p-Erk
  • NFκB
  • U87
  • p-Akt
  • Abstract Ketamine is an anesthetic commonly used in pediatric anesthetic, but it is also a drug that young people today commonly abuse. In the animal model ketamine is shown to cause apoptosis and abnormal behavior in the brain cells of developing rats in the future. DHA belongs to one of the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Previous literature shows that DHA may promote the development of and resistance to apoptosis of nerve cells. This research essay investigates the effects of DHA has a role in U87 glial tumor cell death induced inhibition of ketamine. Cell survival analysis showed that ketamine's effect is dose-dependent. The higher the concentration, the lower the cell viability. DHA in concentration 50μM (inclusive) can increase cell survival, 50μM above will cause cell death; DHA has a protective effect to low doses of ketamine, no protective effect to high doses. And when the DHA produces a protective effect, it can be observed that p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 exhibit increased performance capacity. Ketamine can cause an increase in the amount of p53 , NFκB and BAX performance, and after DHA treatment bcl-2 are showing a upward trend.
    Advisory Committee
  • Chang, Hsueh-Wen - chair
  • Chao-neng Tseng - co-chair
  • Ping-Heng Tan - co-chair
  • Chung-Lung Cho - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0720115-205712.pdf
  • indicate access worldwide
    Date of Submission 2015-08-20

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