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URN etd-0716118-213507
Author Syu-Ruei Jhang
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5565 times. Download 0 times.
Department Environmental Engineering
Year 2017
Semester 2
Degree Ph.D.
Type of Document
Language English
Title The study of reducing health-related hazardous air pollutants and assessing greenhouse gases life cycle by using hydrogen additions in diesel and gasoline internal combustion engine
Date of Defense 2018-07-20
Page Count 165
Keyword
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
  • Carbonyl compounds
  • Traditional pollutants
  • Hydrogen
  • Bioethanol
  • Diesel and gasoline engine
  • Abstract This study investigated hydrogen addition (using de-ionized as the hydrogen source) on diesel and gasoline internal combustion engines. The results show that hydrogen addition (0.6% and 1.2% by volume) lead to an increase of brake thermal efficiency and decrease brake specific fuel consumption on the diesel engine. The hydrogen addition leads to reduce the traditional emissions such as CO2 and CO, but THC increased 4.94% and 13.1% on average with the low level of hydrogen addition (0.6% and 1.2% by volume). Nevertheless, the addition of hydrogen lowered nitrogen oxide emissions at the idling and low load conditions but increased during the high load. Particulate matter formation mainly comes from incomplete combustion, especially during idle condition with lower cylinder temperature. However, hydrogen addition could decrease by 14.1%, 6.86% and 9.75% with the increase of during engine load (25, 50 and 75% engine load). Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone contributed 79.2–87.2% of total carbonyl compounds which are the more prominent when the engine operated at low load. With 0.6 and 1.2 vol% of hydrogen addition, formaldehyde decreased 10.4–10.9% at idling condition. As the load increases 25, 50 and 75%, the formaldehyde decreased by 2.93–25.1, 5.91–25.8 and 2.28–40.5%, respectively. The same reduction phenomenon can also be observed from acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and 2-butanone & butyraldehyde emissions. The highest ozone-formation potential (OFP) from multi-pollution emissions was found an idling operation. The high OFP could be reduced by increasing hydrogen additions and eventually approached the lowest level with 1.2 vol% hydrogen addition at middle to high engine load. The average reduction for total PAHs after hydrogen addition were 56.4%, 34.5%, and 27.9%, respectively. The same trend of total toxicity equivalence (TEF-BaPeq) was pointed out and the average reduction was observed at 44.1%, 23.2%, and 25.4%, respectively after hydrogen addition. According to the gasoline vehicle was fueled with gasoline and multiple bioethanols applied with and without hydrogen addition. The results show that the E3, E6 in the fuel blends benefits the complete combustion of the fuel-air mixture during cold start transient phase compared to the base fuel of G0. Therefore, high inflammation with diffusion speeds of hydrogen addition with E6, E10 improve the combustion process, extend air and fuel mixing more homogeneous, which are average reduced 38.8%, 44.0% for CO, HC, respectively. The small amount of hydrogen addition with bioethanol/gasoline fuel blends slightly reduced the NOx accumulated mass, due to the leaner mixture during cold start. Especially, the dropping trend could also discern after the small amount of hydrogen addition in comparison with the base fuel of G0. The overall of average well-to-tank GHG emissions accounts for 22.3% of the well-to-wheel GHG emissions. This discrepancy is related to feedstock and fuel economy. However, the corn-based E10 offset the well-to-tank GHG emissions with the result of 65.6 g CO2 -e/km. The lowest GHG emissions could be found after the small amount of hydrogen addition within the well-to-tank process, due to lower fuel consumption relative to the lowest GHG emission (65.3 g CO2 -e/km). According to the result of well-to-wheel, the lowest GHG emissions was found 282.6 g CO2 -e/km in E10, which was reduced by 6.96% in comparison with base fuel (G0). However, the small amount of hydrogen for each test result was not a significant decrease in comparison with bioethanol, due to the reason of feedstock within the well-to-tank process.
    Advisory Committee
  • Shui-Jen Chen - chair
  • Jau Huai Lu - co-chair
  • Perng-Jy Tsai - co-chair
  • Kang-Shin Chen - co-chair
  • Yuan-Chung Lin - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0716118-213507.pdf
  • Indicate in-campus at 5 year and off-campus access at 5 year.
    Date of Submission 2018-08-16

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