Title page for etd-0603111-101556


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URN etd-0603111-101556
Author Shang-Chi Du
Author's Email Address No Public.
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Department Institute of Health Care Management
Year 2010
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title The effects of smoking behavior on the acute pain
management: a retrospective study
Date of Defense 2011-05-19
Page Count 63
Keyword
  • surgery
  • postoperative pain
  • analgesic
  • nicotine
  • tobacco smoking
  • Abstract As some references suggested that tobacco smoking behavior increases the risk of persistent pain and poorer recovery, but some demonstrated that nicotine decreased pain sensitivity. Both contrary conclusions make clinicians confused on how to manage the patients with tobacco smoking habit. This study conducted a retrospective way to evaluate the relationship between acute postoperative pain management and tobacco smoking behavior.
    This study included 511 Patients underwent general surgery were assigned to smokers or non-smokers. Site of surgery, type and duration of anesthesia were extracted from the anesthetic record. Information regarded each patient's gender, age, preoperative weight, past medical
    history, postoperative course, all non-opiate sedatives and opiate analgesics used in the first 72 hours were collected and recorded. Morphine administered via a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device was the preferred method of analgesia for these patients. Anesthesia was
    standardized. Exclusion criteria included the patients underwent major thoracic cardiovascular surgery, the patients with significant lung lesion, the patients with conscious disturbance, and the patients with allergic history to morphine.
    The results showed that of the sense of pain, the smoking group in the second day the pain scores significantly higher than non-smoking group (p<0.001), indicated that smoking patients were had more pain than non-smoking patients after surgery. And of the analgesic drug effects,
    the smoking group in the second and third day analgesic doses and the total analgesic doses were significantly higher than non-smoking group (p<0.023), showed that smoking patients significantly used more analgesic than non-smoking group after surgery. Smoking was associated
    with pain indeed existence.
    Advisory Committee
  • Ying-Chun Li - chair
  • none - co-chair
  • Shu-Chuan Yeh - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0603111-101556.pdf
  • indicate in-campus access in a year and off_campus not accessible
    Date of Submission 2011-06-03

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