Title page for etd-0602116-204114


[Back to Results | New Search]

URN etd-0602116-204114
Author Ying-Hsien Chao
Author's Email Address nsysujoel@gmail.com
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5355 times. Download 134 times.
Department Education
Year 2015
Semester 2
Degree Ph.D.
Type of Document
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title How to promote the inclination to donate money among elementary school parents: The perspectives of self-perception theory and karmic- investment hypothesis and the moderating role of cultural factors
Date of Defense 2016-06-13
Page Count 51
Keyword
  • self-perception
  • karmic investments
  • collectivism
  • locus of control
  • monetary donation
  • Abstract In recent years, fund raise has become an important issue regarding sustainability management among education institutions. To investigate optimal strategies for promoting elementary school parents’ behavior intention to donate money to school fund (as measured by the willingness to donate money and the maximum possible amount of monetary donation), two experimental studies will be conducted to examine the predictions from the self-perception theory and the karmic-investment hypothesis. Self-perception theory posits that people often infer their attitudes, identities, and other internal states by observations of their own behaviors. Thus, people are likely to infer themselves as benefactors rather than beneficiaries when they reflect on help-giving experiences rather than help-receiving. Moreover, such a self perception will activate and strengthen their values and their identities as caring, helpful, prosocial individuals, and thereby increase the inclination to engage in prosocial behavior such as donating money to their children’s schools. On the other hand, one may argue that reflecting on help-receiving experiences should induce stronger prosocial inclinations than dose reflecting on help-giving experiences from the perspectives of the norm of reciprocity and gratitude. The first experiment tested these two competing hypotheses by examining which of these two role reflections, recalling experiences of being a benefactor (i.e., help-giving) versus recalling experiences of being a beneficiary (i.e., help-receiving), would enhance the inclination to donate money more strongly. Furthermore, given that a collectivist society such as Taiwan relies on the norm of reciprocity more heavily, Experiment 1 further tested the moderating role of collectivism in the relation of recalling help-giving (vs. help-receiving) to the inclination of monetary donation. Specifically, it was predicted that for school parents with high collectivism, recalling experiences of help-receiving should produce a stronger inclination of monetary donation than recalling experiences of help-giving. In contrast, recalling experiences of help-giving than recalling experiences of help-receiving should induce a prominent inclination to donate money for those school parents with low collectivism. According to the notion of karmic investments, people are more likely to do good deeds when the good-behavior–good-outcome association (i.e., a karmic belief) springs to mind, as if they were “investing in karma” while assuring themselves that good things happen to good people. Moreover, the locus of control theory suggests that individuals with internal locus of control orientations believe that reinforcements or future outcomes are contingent upon their own behaviors. Hence, the inclination to invest in karma should be more pronounced among internal-locus-of-control individuals than among external-locus-of-control individuals. This is because people with low internal-locus-of-control tend to believe that reinforcements or future outcomes are beyond their personal control but rather are under the control of powerful others, luck, chance, fate, etc. Experiment 2 examined whether the priming effect of karmic beliefs on the inclination to donate money would be more prominent among parents with a higher internal locus of control orientation. With respect to parents' willingness to donate money, results from the two experiments supported our predictions. Experiment 1 showed recalling experiences of help-receiving induced a higher willingness to donate money than did recalling experiences of help-giving among parents with high collectivism, whereas recalling experiences of help-giving produced a higher willingness to donate money than did recalling experiences of help-receiving among parents with low collectivism. Experiment 2 demonstrated that priming with karmic beliefs induced a higher willingness to donate money than did the control condition among parents with internal locus of control, whereas the willingness to donate money did not differ between the karmic-belief primes and control conditions among parents with external locus of control. In term of the maximum possible amount of money donated, mean differences regarding the predicted interaction were observed. However, thess interactions in Experiments 1 and 2 did not reach significance, probably resulting from greater variance in this dependent measure. Primary results, theoretical contributions, practical implications, research limitations, and future directions were discussed. The current research might be the first to provide experiment evidence showing the moderating role of two cultural factors (i.e., collectivism and locus of control) in promoting the willingness to donate money via the self-perception and karmic-belief interventions. The present findings may provide cultural contingency models and innovative approaches to strategy application regarding school fundraising.
    Advisory Committee
  • Ming-Chang Chen - chair
  • Chun-Chia Lee - co-chair
  • Hsueh-Hua Chuang - co-chair
  • Ying-Yao Cheng - co-chair
  • Wen-Bin Chiou - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0602116-204114.pdf
  • Indicate in-campus at 2 year and off-campus access at 2 year.
    Date of Submission 2016-07-02

    [Back to Results | New Search]


    Browse | Search All Available ETDs

    If you have more questions or technical problems, please contact eThesys