Title page for etd-0325113-134744


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URN etd-0325113-134744
Author Shih-chieh Hsu
Author's Email Address No Public.
Statistics This thesis had been viewed 5578 times. Download 191 times.
Department Business Management
Year 2012
Semester 2
Degree Master
Type of Document
Language zh-TW.Big5 Chinese
Title Food Contagion Caused by Source's Body Size:Influences of Perceiver's Need for Touch and Type of Food
Date of Defense 2012-07-26
Page Count 108
Keyword
  • type of food
  • vice
  • virtue
  • need for touch
  • contagion effect
  • contagion source’s body size
  • Abstract   In retail environments, people don’t like to buy a product which is touched by someone else. However consumers enjoy touching products to receive product information or to just have fun, Based on the observation of these conflicts, this research attempts to examine how contagion source and consumer individual differences influence product evaluation in different retailing environments.
      The present study uses experimental design to investigate the food evaluation of contagion source’s body size (slim vs. medium vs. no contagion source), need for touch (high vs. low) and type of food (vice vs. virtue) Thus, a 3x2x2 factorial design is conducted. This study manipulates six different scenarios to observe the attitudes toward the food and the purchase intentions. Besides, this study also compares the situations with contagion: contagion source’s body size (slim vs. medium), need for touch (high vs. low) and type of food (vice vs. virtue) to examine the interaction effects.
      The results indicate that the negative contagion effect is lower after the person with a slim size touched the food than a person with a medium size touched it. Individuals with high need for touch are more likely to accept that food was touched by others than the counterparts with low need for touch. Respondents who are in high need for touch produce positive contagion effect after a slim person touched virtue food. Based on these findings, this study suggests that food retailers should recruit slim salespersons in retailing environments. The findings also provide some insights regarding how to reduce the negative contagion effects.
    Advisory Committee
  • Hsiao-Ching Lee - chair
  • Yu-Chi Wu - co-chair
  • Chun-Tuan Chang - advisor
  • Files
  • etd-0325113-134744.pdf
  • Indicate in-campus at 5 year and off-campus access at 5 year.
    Date of Submission 2013-03-25

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